RSS directory submission provides immediate link popularity


RSS directory submission provides immediate link popularity. RSS directories are similar to web directories - you get a free, one-way link back to your site when you are listed. Think about this. Most RSS directories carry a pagerank (PR) of 5 or higher. When you multiply that over 60 RSS directories, that is a lot of links back to your site - meaning increased search engine rank and more visitors.

There are over 210 million blogs in 2012. If you own a blog, how are you going to promote it in order to stay ahead of the competition? Fortunately, there is a simple, yet very effective method: RSS directory submission. Submitting your RSS newsfeed to specialized news directories benefits your site in several ways.

RSS directory submission increases your readership. When a person is looking for newsfeeds to add to their RSS reader, it is highly likely they will visit an RSS directory to find newsfeeds on their subject of interest. I recently visited a directory looking for personal business blogs. I subscribed to several, and now read them via RSS on a regular basis. Someone else may have an excellent business blog, but since they weren't listed in the directory, I was unable to discover their site. RSS directory submission enables your content to be duplicated and linked to from other sites. One of the key benefits of syndicating content through RSS is that it increases your reach. You can publish an article, then have excerpts of that article placed on hundreds of other websites with links back to the original on your site. Many webmasters want to have fresh content for their visitors, and embedding an RSS newsfeed is the easiest way to do that. You'll want to make sure that you are listed in RSS directories when a webmaster visits looking for website content or your competitors may get the free promotion.

Web feed

A web feed (or news feed) is a data format used for providing users with frequently updated content. Content distributors syndicate a web feed, thereby allowing users to subscribe to it. Making a collection of web feeds accessible in one spot is known as aggregation, which is performed by an aggregator. A web feed is also sometimes referred to as a syndicated feed.

A typical scenario of web feed use is: a content provider publishes a feed link on their site which end users can register with an aggregator program (also called a feed reader or a news reader) running on their own machines; doing this is usually as simple as dragging the link from the web browser to the aggregator. When instructed, the aggregator asks all the servers in its feed list if they have new content; if so, the aggregator either makes a note of the new content or downloads it. Aggregators can be scheduled to check for new content periodically. Web feeds are an example of pull technology, although they may appear to push content to the user.

The kinds of content delivered by a web feed are typically HTML (webpage content) or links to webpages and other kinds of digital media. Often when websites provide web feeds to notify users of content updates, they only include summaries in the web feed rather than the full content itself.

A web feed is a document (often XML-based) whose discrete content items include web links to the source of the content. News websites and blogs are common sources for web feeds, but feeds are also used to deliver structured information ranging from weather data to top-ten lists of hit tunes to search results. The two main web feed formats are RSS and Atom.


RSS

RSS (Rich Site Summary); originally RDF Site Summary; often dubbed Really Simple Syndication, uses a family of standard web feed formats[2] to publish frequently updated information: blog entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed",[3] or "channel") includes full or summarized text, and metadata, like publishing date and author's name.

RSS feeds enable publishers to syndicate data automatically. A standard XML file format ensures compatibility with many different machines/programs. RSS feeds also benefit users who want to receive timely updates from favourite websites or to aggregate data from many sites.

Once users subscribe to a website RSS removes the need for them to manually check it. Instead, their browser constantly monitors the site and informs the user of any updates. The browser can also be commanded to automatically download the new data for the user.

RSS files are essentially XML formatted plain text. The RSS file itself is relatively easy to read both by automated processes and by humans alike. An example file could have contents such as the following. This could be placed on any appropriate communication protocol for file retrieval, such as http or ftp, and reading software would use the information to present a neat display to the end users.

Software termed "RSS reader", "aggregator", or "feed reader", which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based, present RSS feed data to users. Users subscribe to feeds either by entering a feed's URI into the reader or by clicking on the browser's feed icon. The RSS reader checks the user's feeds regularly for new information and can automatically download it, if that function is enabled. The reader also provides a user interface.

RSS is delivered to end users through "feeds", a more or less universal form of downloadable raw data ("universal" in that all feeds are in XML. Different flavors of feeds can vary slightly) which can be read with a variety of applications, including FeedBucket. The websites you already read may offer an RSS feed; if you don't already know what the feed address is, you may be able to find it linked to with a small blue or orange icon that reads either "XML" or "RSS".


RSS Reader/Agregator

In computing, a news aggregator, also termed a feed aggregator, feed reader, news reader, RSS reader or simply aggregator, is client software or a web application which aggregates syndicated web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and video blogs (vlogs) in one location for easy viewing.


What is RSS Feed Submission?

RSS is unique because it is not just one piece of content but a constant stream to any new content that is published to the feed. Every blog has an RSS feed built in and this means that every time you publish content on your blog, the RSS feed gets updated with that new post. There are also tools now that allow you to create RSS feeds from all kinds of content - not just blogs.

RSS & Blog directories work differently to regular web directories as they don't list list your feed (well, some do) - they poll the feed and list the content. As new content is published to the feed, the directories that have your feed listed are updated with that content creating new a fresh stream of backlinks without you having to do any more work.


Why Is RSS Submission So Good For Link Building?

The effectiveness of RSS submission depends largely on the feed that you submit. If you submit a feed to a stream of content which is regularly updated such as a busy blog, then that submission brings you new backlinks every time you publish a new post even though you only needed to perform the submission once! No other type of submission has this unique characteristic.


How do I get the URL for an RSS Feed

The easiest way to get the address, no matter what web browser you're using, is to look at the HTML source of your page. How you view it in your web browser will differ, but in most browsers, you'll choose the Page Source or Source option under the View menu near the top of the window. Once the window appears with the HTML for your page, use the "Find" feature (typically Ctrl-F on a PC, Command-F on a Mac) and search for "RSS" (without the quotes).

You should be taken to a line that reads something like:

If it matches something like Then the url given in the "href" is the URL for the RSS Feed. In the above example, it would be: http://www.benchmarkemail.com/blogs/rss.xml If you are using Firefox and the page has a RSS Feed, you will see an RSS icon in the address bar.

If you click on the icon, you will be redirected to the RSS Feed URL. You can use this URL as the RSS Feed URL.


How to Find Your RSS Address

The easiest way to get the address, no matter what web browser you're using, is to look at the HTML source of your page. How you view it in your web browser will differ, but in most browsers, you'll choose the Page Source or Source option under the View menu near the top of the window. Once the window appears with the HTML for your page, use the "Find" feature (typically Ctrl-F on a PC, Command-F on a Mac) and search for "RSS" (without the quotes).

You should be taken to a line that reads something like: The RSS feed's URL address is found between the quotes after href= . In this case, it would be: http://www.aweber.com/blog/feed/

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